What’s the Matter with Matter and Antimatter That Lets Us Exist?


(Susan Linkletter) #1

I just read this article, that basically says that according to the laws of physics we should not exist. I realize that there is some danger in speculating that this could be proof that we are here because of divine intervention, but after reading this article it sure makes me think so.


(George Brooks) #2

@Susan_Linkletter,

Don’t forget that this is BioLogos. Individuals who champion the goals of BioLogos for the most part accept the role of God in the operation of the Universe.

But, naturally, the article does sound interesting.


(Susan Linkletter) #3

There are many out there that think we don’t need a god anymore because science has all the answers about how the world began. Its just interesting to learn that there is this huge gap in the “Big Bang” theory that cannot be explained by our current scientific knowledge.


(James McKay) #4

You ought to get hold of a copy of “We Have No Idea” by Jorge Cham (of PhD Comics fame) and Daniel Whiteson. It talks about a whole lot of other unanswered questions in physics and it’s a fascinating read.

Incidentally, there’s a problem with the criticism of the “God-of-the-gaps” argument that gaps have a nasty habit of getting filled in. Gaps in scientific knowledge are a bit like a game of whack-a-mole: as soon as you fill in one, another one opens up somewhere else. In fact, there are theorems such as Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem and Turing’s halting problem that seem to indicate that no matter how much science discovers and how many gaps are filled in, there will always be new gaps with new, interesting questions.


(George Brooks) #5

@Susan_Linkletter,

We should always remember that the Big Bang was proposed by a very religious man. And that some rejected the idea because they thought it was merely religious mumbo jumbo.

As for “huge gap”… don’t you mean a “tiny gap”? We do very well regressing the Big Bang model backwards … until just before we reach Zero Time. That’s a pretty small gap… God fits in there very nicely!


(Mervin Bitikofer) #6

In fact the real situation may even be much more extreme. They could probably be called the “exploding gaps”. The more we learn the more expansive the frontier borders of knowledge become. Just think of how small the gap about “life substances” was several centuries ago. So there was some kind of “vital stuff” that was different than rock or air or water. Maybe it’s plant “stuff” … maybe animal “stuff”. Mysterious to be sure, but really … not much to see here. Introduce microscopes and it all got more interesting. But still; these are just simple little blobs, right? Now with microbiology and DNA, our volume of things we don’t know took an exponential leap!

Or the cosmos – pretty big, yes; but it’s all right there. Just look up in the night sky. A few mysteries, yes; but the ancient gaps in knowledge were nowhere near as impressive as the multitude of galaxies we now know that we can never reach or explore in detail. Indeed we can rightly worship a God of the Gaps since Gaps now make up 99.999…% of a vastly larger expanse.

Of course it is always good to remind ourselves that God is also sovereign over the little pittance that we fancy we have mastered too.


(Roger A. Sawtelle) #7

@Susan_Linkletter

In a sense I agree with @gbrooks9 for a change. If there is a gap, it is a gap of less than a second, but really there is no gap.

Science in the form of the Big Bang Theory takes us as far as it can go, to the Beginning of the universe, to t = 0. From there we must move through philosophy and theology to God. Faith helps, but it does not require faith to accept a relatively logical progression. It does take faith to really trust in God.

God does not close a gap. God is the Source of the universe and Reality.