The positive byproducts of the negative parts of 2020 in your life?

We’ve probably all have heard the jokes about “we it’s 2020” or “what now 2020” referring to the seemingly back to back crappy events. People often focus on the negative. But I’m curious what’s some of the positive things that only begin to take shape in your life because of 2020. These things don’t diminish the effect of the bad things but it does not mean the good things don’t exist either.

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I cant really seem to have one. The people) you mi krumm included) who knew my situation this summer was hell actually. As for the months before. Neither something possitive or negative happened. But i guess the main posstive thing to happen to us(all here ) is: Beign in a relative free country,having a plate of food,a roof on thy head and of course people who love us. God help us

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For me there has been a few good things to come out of it all.

Because of most of the public shutting down due to the virus it’s left me with a significant amount more of alone time than normal. Because for over half a year I did not do anything socially really I got into the habit of spending about 1 hour a day petting my cats. I just sat down and put in my earphones and played with my cats while listening to podcasts. Because production got shut down on a handful of shows and movies I was looking forward to I begin to listen to horror audio dramas including older shows by Orson Welles and o found a handful of new podcasts to listen to as well. Because of the virus we begin to split jobs up to smaller teams and on separate jobs. Lots of smaller projects like fixing siding or building a deck or doing small flower beds and so on. That meant on the job I was doing a lot less running around because I had less worry over something going wrong with smaller projects. I was also able to read for about an extra 30 minutes more a day.

In southeastern USA we have been struck by multiple hurricanes. The main one that got me was Hurricane Sally. I ended up losing power for 9 days. No one on my street had power during this time either. Over 30 trees fell on my property. Because of this when I went outside at night, the sky was so much more lovely than normal. With all the trees down, though I liked them, I was able to sit t my bench and see a lot more sky at once than previously. Though many trees ent down thst I did not like there was some good things with the trees specifically. I had two southern magnolias in my backyard about 24 feet tall that was in the shadow of a few oaks pushing 40-50 feet tall, a 50 foot sweet gum and dozens of 20-30 feet pines. Because of the southern magnolias in the shade they never flowered. Maybe one or two flowers a season. But with all the larger trees down around them, snd they somehow surviving, I know with the extra light they will spread some and begin flowering. Now I can also redesign it with some more native trees of my choosing instead of everything having to be shade losing shrubs in the back.

In general, because of civilization dying back it has really done the earth some wonders. I feel like it allowed some decent healing to kick in and wildlife seems to be benefiting from it.

So despite a lot of the garbage that happened this year it rearranged my life in a way that I begin to be able to spend more time doing some of the things I enjoy more often.

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I was about to pass this thread by since one feels overwhelmed by all that was lost. But then I realized there was at least one upside. Sometime early in March I developed flu symptoms and was encouraged by my doctor (who was originally my wife’s doctor) to sleep in separate rooms to be sure not pass it on to Lia just in case it was COVID. (At that time testing was not available.)

Well now neither of us wants to sleep in the same room anymore. I mean, if we have a guest staying with us in some non-COVID future, then sure we can bunk together. But being older, sleep is hard enough to achieve under the best of conditions. Sleeping in the same bed we are apt to wake the other every time we get up to pee, and that isn’t a rare occurrence for either of us. Plus I like to get to sleep early and get up early whereas she tends to stay up later, and I sleep better in a dark, quiet room. On top of that, Lia is a worrier and isn’t shy about sharing these whenever they occur to her, even when I’m nearing the point of slipping off to sleep. Conjugal encounters can happen in either room without sleeping over. Who knew?

Another plus is that while Lia has never wanted dogs on our bed, I’ve always been fine with it. So now I have a special dog spread I put on as soon as I get up and make the bed. Then after I let them out and feed them, when we come back upstairs they know they can join me on the bed.

Another plus has been maintaining a more regular schedule. Because of increased restrictions on dog walking off leash almost everywhere we’ve been getting up just before dawn and going to the park next door to exercise the dog while my older dog has breakfast. While I sit on a bench throwing the ball for Smoke, Lia does three laps around the field. Then we go back and feed the young dog and take the older one for a sedate walk around the block … or sometimes to the coffee shop instead. This is especially good for me because I welcome an early schedule. But Lia likes it too because she really likes to walk and it is safer together. She often goes back to bed for while when we’re done.

I’m glad you asked Mi. It made me realize there have been some good parts.

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I prefer to sleep by myself as well. With my ex we ran into similar issues even though we were younger. I like hard surfaces. I use to sleep on a mat I could roll out on the floor. I also prefer sleeping in total darkness. I even black out the little charging lights on some devices. My ex she liked big soft beds and went to sleep with the lights in the hallway on. Other than two years I was with her I’ve slept alone my whole life. I never stay out at other people’s houses either and so I always come back to my house. My fiancée won’t be cool with it. But im ok sharing a bed. She already knows I sleep in almost complete darkness with just a small fan on as noise. Throughout my life the biggest complaint I’ve had is that I sleep with thin sheets and not blankets. I keep my room normally around 72°f. In winter I sleep on a heating blanket. My fiancée sleeps with some lights on too. So when she and so get married and she moves in I told her instead of a night light ill use those glow in the dark stars and place a few down the hallway to help be used as guides.

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I really like this question. Thank you!
For about 2 months, in our clinic we had to take home call alternating with clinic work to avoid congregation in the clinic, and Covid spread. That meant that we did telemedicine visits from home for one week, and then in the clinic one week. We only saw urgent cases and canceled all our annual and preventative, routine visits. While it took away most of my work, I was able to take my two boys and their dog out for a walk nearly every day in the 2.2 mile wood path in the park nearby. The times we spent talking and learning about each other I will never forget. We still do this on Saturdays.

My in laws, missionaries in Togo, were home for a funeral and were quarantined with us. For 6 months, they lived in a fifth wheel trailer in our yard. Whereas we hadn’t seen them for 2 years at a time (Skype doesn’t work well in their region), we got to see and eat with them every day. That was especially important for my kids.

Also, the pulling together of our governments (federal, state and local), along with scientists and agencies like WHO, the NIH and CDC, really impressed me that people who care about the “least of these” (the elderly and those most likely to suffer) make up the bureaucracies. I’m grateful.

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Good question. Well, I guess 2020 has reaffirmed to me that homeschooling and self-employment are the right choices for us at the moment. But also, even though I’m a hardcore introvert, the pandemic has helped remind me that I really do need community outside of just my family. So I hope it’s helped me appreciate my community a bit more, and just the ability to go out and attend events. But I wish we had been a bit more intentional about inviting people over to our yard when the weather was warm and we could do things outside. And I hope that even if this is “over” by next summer, we’ll still keep that intentionality about finding ways to gather with friends aside from just attending events.

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Never do I remember a particular class (year) of students who were so eager to actually be back in school. It remains to be seen if or how long it will last, of course, but overall students who are able to make physical school attendance work with at least some safety measures in place are really happy to be there.

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In reflecting, I have sort of enjoyed the social distancing as I grew up on a farm rather isolated, mostly me and my dog. Only problem is I don’t have a dog now, and with travel to visit kids and grandkids, don’t really want the responsibility. It did let me refocus on projects around the house, of which there are many as I live on a small acreage, and refocus on family relationships rather than the ambitious plans for travel we had. As a side effect, I lost a little weight and am more fit from outdoor activity and being more mindful of diet and exercise. Still need to lose more, but hopefully have better habits.
Also, with retirement at about the same time, it has helped me make adjustments there.

While the negative part on our experience lately has been the polarization of society, I like to think that a positive byproduct has been learning how to give grace to those who I disagree with, and trying to see their position a bit better. I still struggle with that one as even this morning I was reading a post on social media by one of my dear friends, and felt some anger and frustration with the view expressed (anti-vac) before telling myself to let it go.

One thing that is yet to be determined as a result of all this, is that we purchased a small travel trailer to take with us on domestic travels and to stay in when visiting the grandkids who live a ways off and do not really have the room in their homes for us. It has been fun so far, but it definitely another level of complexity to deal with learning the ropes of using it, and I keep telling people it may be for sale next week. Sort of like in Princess Bride, when the Dread Pirate Roberts tells Westley every evening, “Good night, Westley. Good work. Sleep well. I’ll most likely kill you in the morning.”

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Many of the things that humanity has loved and put their trust in other than God have been taken away or shaken. God uses calamity to judge the nations and prune His people. It is a good thing to be humbled before the Lord.

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Welcome to the other side! It’s true. There is life after work. :wink:

Good for you, Phil. I’m afraid my weight has been going the opposite direction. I sure do miss my classes and routines at the Y.

If your travels ever take you through the San Francisco bay area, you’d be more than welcome take a layover in our side yard on your way through. It’d be a pleasure to meet you in person.

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I’ve been grateful to learn some negative parts of my life that I can change. For example, I was not aware of how judgmental I can be about those who do not wear the mask. Talking with others who are close to me helps me see the flaws in my own life, and through this, perhaps learn to be better

My wife also gets very angry at non maskers. Early on, I did too. But there are so many and life is too short to be that mad that often. Fortunately I’ve been noticing more masks recently.

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Good idea for a blog, SkovandOfMitaze…Good things also occurred this year…a neighbor had a healthy baby boy for example…with a healthy set of lungs (I can attest!!)

The year HAS brought new and positive changes for Mark D (and his wife), it seems. For me — the two months of lockdown (March- April especially) did wonders for a right shoulder that was still sore after 21 years of “the wheel in the bus goes round and round”…retirement helped heal various physical things that were ornery after years on the accelerator (and then the brakes) etc, but staying indoors just plain gave that shoulder the needed rest!!

And then I used it to drive across the country to a couple national parks. That, apparently, is what MANY people did this summer — get away from the MASKED HORDES to a place where social distancing comes naturally. So far as known, bison are not carriers of COVID19…

And like Laura the “hardcore introvert,” I also have learned to appreciate the value of community “a bit more.”

And I have lost weight and done a lot of walking (15,000 steps a day)…

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My daughter was born on September 18th. She’s healthy and happy. :slight_smile:

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