The Days of Proclamation Creation Scenario!


(George Brooks) #1

Continuing the discussion from Otangelo has questions about the age of the earth:

@Socratic.Fanatic, I wanted to kick off a thread dedicated to the Days of Proclamation Creation … there may be others who can add to our understanding of this particular scenario. One of its advantages is that it can disentangle the issue of the time of creation from the millions of years for the age of the Earth !!!

TO: @r_speir
I think your post is a very useful one because you’ve explained an excellent example of how someone can embrace “six literal days” within an old earth view. You probably already know this, but readers may find it helpful to know that the view you are describing is often called The Days of Proclamation view of creation. Because God is outside of time (because time is an attribute of the matter-energy universe he created), the author wanted us to understand God’s “vantage point” outside of creation where he issued commands as separate creative acts but sure to be fulfilled within creation at the appropriate times throughout the timeline of the universe. Thus, when God issued the command that the waters would bring forth creatures, every timeline event related to the origins of various kinds of aquatic life became a sure thing. You could even say that God “authorized” the creation of each and every aquatic creature species but that that creative commandment was fulfilled throughout the timeline as appropriate. (Yes, evolutionary processes could be at work for many generations leading up to each of those species.) Likewise, when God created the beasts of the field, birds of the air, and everything which creepeth upon the earth, all of those creative events along the timeline became inevitable realities no matter where and when those events would occur.

Does my description of the Days of Proclamation fit what you are saying?

Notice that the Days of Proclamation don’t even have to be issued in a particular chronological order, because that culture was not bound by such chronological notions. Indeed, as a boss of a building project, I could issue orders as a general contractor to all of my subcontractors in any sequence I wish and give each a calendar date when they begin and end their work—because the subcontractors know from experience where the various elements come into play and how to integrate their labor into the building process of all of the trades. (Thus, I might issue the contract for the wiring of the building long before the foundation is poured. Everybody knows that the wiring comes later, but that doesn’t stop me from authorizing the work and telling them what to do and when.)
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#2

Taylor misses the point here: https://answersingenesis.org/days-of-creation/days-of-revelation-or-creation/ saying that God was merely “telling” in advance what he was going to later create. He asks “Is there any Scriptural basis for believing that God was only revealing, not creating, on those six days?” This statement biases the remainder of his analysis and so handicaps its usefulness. In opposition to Taylor I would only say that in Genesis 1, when God speaks, God creates, no matter how long the fulfillment of the command takes. This commentator https://luke443.blogspot.com/2012/10/creation-fiat-theory-or-days-of.html says it much better: “It is vital to appreciate that when God declares something it will come to pass; it may takes days or years or thousands, millions or even billions of years but it is as good as done the moment God gives the word.”


(system) #3

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