Summer Reading Program?

For those who influence children–do you have a summer reading program for your kids? If so, which books to you plan on, and will you reward your kids for reading them?
Mine (13, 10 and 7) are looking forward to the break! They love reading, but we’d like to set them goals with rewards (maybe some time on a trip, or on the Switch). Do you have any other ideas?

Thanks!

Kids in grades 1-6 can do Barnes and Noble summer reading program and earn a free book. My kids have enjoyed it in the past, but they are all too old now.

https://www.barnesandnobleinc.com/our-stores-communities/summer-reading-program/

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Thank you! That looks great. I have been looking for something like that. Hope your summer goes well.

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As a kid, I always did the ones at the library!

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Moved to the Homeschool Forum @Randy, hope that’s okay. It seemed a better fit there.

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Can any one suggest cross cultural books to help improve cross racial understanding? Thanks.

My kids are reading the following: "What If," by Randall Munroe (XKCD)

Cartoon Guide to Biology, Physics and Chemistry

History comics History Comics: The Great Chicago Fire: Rising From the Ashes: Hannigan, Kate, Graudins, Alex: 9781250174260: Amazon.com: Books

Maker Comics

I know there are a lot more recent titles to help kids more specifically deal with racism and racial identities, but some of the books I’ve read with my kids were:

The Watsons Go to Birmingham
Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry
Weedflower (about a Japanese American girl at a WW2 internment camp and her friendship with a Native American boy she meets on the reservation they were sent to.)
Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy
In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson
My Name is Malala (non-fiction about a young Afghani Nobel Prize winner)
Esperanza Rising
The Stone Goddess (about a Cambodian family who comes to the US after living in Khmer Rouge labor camps)

A lot of them have sad parts and are not really what you hand a kid for light summer reading, but I do think consistent exposure to the stories of people with very different life experiences and the hard parts of history help increase their empathy and cultural competence.

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Thank you very much! I think that’s a very helpful selection. Maybe I’ll read some of them with my older son

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