Greg Boyd and Divine Violence


(Randy) #1

Has anyone read Greg Boyd’s “Crucifixion of the Warrior God” and “Cross Vision”? Onscript and Pete Enns interviewed him with great clarity here andhere.

I’ve read “Cross Vision,” and found the insight helpful, though not answering all my questions. The background is that as pastor of a large church of young people in Minnesota, Greg Boyd tried to research a book answering their earnest questions about violence attributed to God in the Old Testament. He found he couldn’t give good answers. As a result, he felt that with Jesus saying He was the “better revelation,” God best showed Himself in the Crucifixion–where He suffered with us and for us–and that our interpretation of violence in the OT was piecemeal His trying to bring us, through progressive revelation, back to Him. I agree with God’s showing Himself in His sacrifice, which seems to be unique to Christianity. I’m not sure of the other implications he makes.

He also espouses open theism–where, to maintain freedom of choice and thought in mankind, He allows his own knowledge to be “dynamic and…flexible.” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_theism" I am intrigued by this, but think it’s one way of looking at a puzzle–not the only way.

I’d appreciate both agreement and critiques from those who have read much more than I.


(Peter Wolfe) #2

I read Cross Vision. While in general agreement I thought he worked too hard to show that God never said kill them all. He doesn’t want to go to the Pete Enns place of God’s children told the story and they got it wrong.


(RiderOnTheClouds) #3

I simply see no way to justify the slaughter of children or animals for the “sins” of the Canaanites. BTW their only ‘sin’ was living on land which YHWH appointed for Israel and himself. Let’s not even get into the fact that cherem was basically human sacrifice.


(Randy) #4

I think that Boyd agrees with you here.


(system) #5

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