Flood Geology and the Grand Canyon: What Does the Evidence Really Say?


(system) #1
5 scientific evidences that show the impossibility of a single flood carving the Grand Canyon.
This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://biologos.org/blogs/archive/flood-geology-and-the-grand-canyon-what-does-the-evidence-really-say

(George Brooks) #2

An excellent article dealing in scientific basics…

about GEOLOGY … instead of the confusing topics of biology… Keep it up!


(Cris) #3

What a great article. Very easy to understand and provides compelling arguments against “flood geology” claims. I am ordering the book referenced in the article!


(Wookin Panub) #4

It’s merely an interpretation. The other camp can up up with equally strong interpretation


(Phil) #5

Well, they can put up an interpretation, but not equally strong. Scientific findings ideally tend to stand on their own merits, and while the strength of those merits can be argued, ultimately they stand or fall on their validity.
The Grand Canyon is amazing to just stand and look at. It is difficult to understand how anyone can think it is less than ancient. Perhaps equally amazing is the canyon that lies beneath the Nile Delta, recently discussed in the Natural Historian blog.


(Wookin Panub) #6

I appreciate your response my fellow brother in Christ. That is your presupposition. I myself, have a presupposition that can easily see how a great worldwide flood could carve out the grand canyon. It does not need millions of years to do it. :slight_smile:


#7

A really sneaky God could carve the grand canyon in 10 seconds, making it look like it took millions of years.


(Phil) #8

Why then is there only one Grand Canyon? You would think they would be everywhere.


(Tim Helble) #9

jpm - there are many deep, spectacular canyons all over the world. A few that come to mind in the U.S., are Hells Canyon at the Oregon/Idaho border, Black Canyon of the Gunnison in Colorado, Zion Canyon in Utah, Yosemite Valley in California. Each of these is awesomely beautiful in its own way, but the Grand Canyon is considered “grand” because of the spectacular rock layers that it is carved through. You don’t find deep canyons in the vast central U.S. because it is so close to sea level - it’s kind of hard for a canyon to exist at elevations below the current sea level.


(Phil) #10

Indeed there are many canyons, but none like the Grand. Although the “fossil canyon” below the Nile may be similar in size.


(George Brooks) #11

@Wookin_Panub

Back in 1978, my physics professor explained that the Grand Canyon could have been made, filled and made again dozens of times.

What makes the Grand Canyon incompatible with YEC is the pattern of the sedimentary layers.

And when you combine the Grand Canyon with the inexplicable pattern of fossils … no dinosaurs buried above large mammals … and in Australia there are no modern placental mammals at all… only marsupials… with the reverse pattern everywhere else in the world.


(Andrew M. Wolfe) #12

What a wonderfully lucid article! I hope you find many readers!

I bet you’d get tons of people buying it at the Grand Canyon visitors’ center, if they’re allowed to carry this sort of material… but somehow I don’t think Creationists would be very happy about that. :slight_smile:


(Tim Helble) #13

AM - the book is indeed being carried at the Grand Canyon visitor’s center. In fact, it is being carried at all bookstores operated by the Grand Canyon Association.


(Andrew M. Wolfe) #14

That’s fantastic! Visitors there are both the most motivated to read it AND the most likely to benefit from it…

You know, come to think of it, you could almost craft a “curious YECers guided tour” around the contents of the book, and take folks around physically looking at all the evidence you present in the book. :smiley: Summer break side income stream, anyone? :smiley:

Anyway, bravo, guys. Really excited for this book.


#15

Ken Ham, the Reverend Barry Lynn, Executive Director of Americans United, and Jay Hall from Kentucky’s Tourism, Arts, and Humanities will be guests on a Kentucky radio station this afternoon. The fur is gonna fly, and it won’t be from the ark animals!


(Jan De Boer) #16

What a great article. Allow me a few additions. You state that no sediments have been found that were caused by the Flood. A man, Tom Haiden made a documentary “Extinct, the Irish Elk” and states that he found a 15,000 year old layer af sediments without any fossils. You inspired me to write a new post on the Forum, “The Cause of the Flood reloaded”. You might find there some new facts that you did not know. Maybe someone might ask Ken Ham how he explains Adam’s Bridge.


(Phil) #17

Sort of off topic, but relates to the Grand Canyon:
We were discussing the “fear of God” Sunday, and the in reading how some have tried to describe it, I recalled standing at the edge of the Grand Canyon, awed and amazed, and as there are lots of areas without guardrails, you can stand on the edge of the abyss, and those who fear heights may actually crawl on their knees to the edge to draw near. That feeling of awe and fear seems to be the closest I know to the awe and fear of God.


#18

Just wanted to echo what some of the others are saying. What a great article! Love it when the truth shines.


(Robert Hawes) #19

Excellent article! I’m intrigued enough here to want to get my hands on a copy of the book when funds permit.

Here’s a point I’ve been wondering about for some time now: if the alleged global Flood was violent enough to carve out the Grand Canyon in such a short period of time, why does not more of the Earth’s surface resemble the canyon? Why do we see such expansive regions of flatland? Shouldn’t most of the planet’s surface be severely scarred and gutted? The fact that the Grand Canyon is such a striking feature would seem to argue that it is the product of localized rather than global forces.


(Phil) #20

While I mentioned it above, the Natural Historian blog has a series of articles about the “Grand Canyon” of the Nile that is below the Nile River valley, where it was carved then filled with sediment to where it is today. Amazing to think about.