Favorite Work of Art

I’m curious what your favorite work of art is. I have been reading more of Henry Nouwen’s life lately, and was interested to learn that his favorite painting was Rembrandt’s “Return of the Prodigal Son.” There is more about that painting than I can put down here, but I wonder if others can also comment on what they think of it.

One quote from Nouwen: “I am the prodigal son every time I search for unconditional love where it cannot be found.”
Thanks.

6 Likes

Oooh, we’re getting some culture here! Unfortunately I’m pretty uncultured at art history. I like a lot of M. C. Escher’s just because they’re so intriguing, like “House of Stairs.”

3 Likes

Sorry to say, my choice of classic paintings is limited. I am perhaps most impressed with The Wedding Feast at Cana as I saw it at the Louvre on a trip back when we could still travel. It is about 20 ft b 30 feet in size, and you can immerse yourself in the scene. At the time, it was in the same hall at the opposite end from the Mona Lisa.

Usually, I get my classical painting education from the That is Priceless comic strip, which pairs classical paintings with humorous captions. Caution, as some are a little risqué.

1 Like

The first that came to mind.

Young Woman Sleeping

Another Rembrandt, Young Woman Sleeping

2 Likes

The second

Dürer, Great Piece of Turf

1 Like

I am everyone in the picture.

1 Like

Beautiful. Can you clarify? Thanks.

Well the three males, sorry! The prodigal, the bitter son, the father, to myself and my sons.

1 Like

that made me smile! Thanks. Sorry,–I thought you were referring to the plants and the lady in the drawings you made. Yes, I’m that way, too. I’ve usually identified with the elder, but have been the prodigal too. I haven’t been in the position of the father so much yet!

Here’s an interpretation I found as well. I had no idea that Rembrandt appeared to put the older son in a more favorable light (remorseful). Interesting.
http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/famous-paintings/return-of-the-prodigal-son.htm

Would you consider analyzing the paintings you posted, too, for us? Thanks!

It’s the minimal genius of the Rembrandt sketch, it probably took less than five minutes, a minute even, and it captures everything.

The Dürer is almost opposite, exquisite detail in the easily overlooked mundane.

1 Like

Dance at Bougival, Renoir. My favorite thing in one of my favorite places on earth (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston). No reason, at least none that I can explain using this keyboard.
But here’s a video I took a few years ago. No need for sound on.

3 Likes

Tough assignment. My preference runs toward playful, imaginative things but I like a wide range of subject matter. I’ll just admire yours.

1 Like

What comes to my mind isn’t a painting but a statue. Sorry.

The Pieta by Michelangelo.

2 Likes

I’m blessed with Stendhal’s syndrome, as I’ve shared before. I just plunge joyfully in to silent weeping. Nobody notices, apart from my poor wife. One doesn’t make an exhibition of oneself. The salon of Monets at the D’Orsay. A single Monet at the National. He can do no wrong. And Turner’s The Fighting Temeraire. They’ve all done it. And Sisley’s The Seine at Suresnes back at the D’Orsay. And Sir Godfrey Kneller’s Sir Isaac Newton at the National Portrait Gallery. And… Seeing The Pieta would do it. And Titian’s Portrait of a Young Englishman, at the Palazzo Pitti. And…

1 Like

I don’t know much about art (I am a musician), but the moment I saw Dennis Miller Bunker’s “A Bohemian”, I had a strong reaction to it.

1 Like

Great! I changed the title to “Work of Art.” I, too, love “The Pieta.”

I love this painting as well.

1 Like

First thing that came to my mind…also by Michelangelo. I’ve been fortunate enough to see the original, in the Uffizi in Florence (saw the David & the Pieta in Florence, as well). The painting is notable for a couple things. First, it’s unusual for being originally painted on a round canvas, and it still exists in its original framing this way. Second, it’s one of the first paintings to go beyond just the standard medieval depiction of the Madonna & child, and to include Joseph in the Holy Family. For hundreds of years every medieval painter & his brother painted the Madonna & child w/ Baby Jesus sitting on Mary’s left knee, with Joseph nowhere to be seen. To me this captures Michelangelo’s genius, really visualizing his subject in a novel way, including having Baby Jesus coming over Mary’s right shoulder. The figure to the right is widely held to be a young John the Baptist. As for the nekkid guys in the background…the jury’s been out on them for 500 years or so.

1 Like

Well I’ve really been stymied trying to come up with a particular painting or sculpture but I wonder how murals and architectural works fit here? The first one is of the painted dome of the famous Wieskirche, UN World Heritage, Bavaria, Germany.

The other photos are all of the Cathedral Gaudi designed, the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona. I’ve never been to Spain yet but it is number one on my wish list as I love his work. It is not yet completely built. I find all of his works exciting but I wonder how well this sort of architecture would please you as a place of worship? I find it mind blowing and I fully intend to stand in line all day if that is what it takes. But honestly it probably draws more attention to itself than to anything beyond.

2 Likes

I guess I don’t really have a favorite. A few of the ones I really like are:

  1. A funayurei ( 1852 )
  2. Apparition of the Cat Witch ( 1835 )
  3. Onzoshi Ushiwaka Maru and the tengu King (1848)

I am not a big art fan though as in knowing who they are and so on so many that I like I don’t know the name of.

When it comes to sculptures one of my favorites is still alive and it’s Scott Radke. Does horrorish garden sculptures.

1 Like

“Let your conversation be always full of grace, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how to answer everyone.” -Colossians 4:6

This is a place for gracious dialogue about science and faith. Please read our FAQ/Guidelines before posting.