Creation Photos Around the World

Cool bugs …

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On an 8.5 mile run with my 13 year old son today. Beautiful foliage…he remarked that it was like a rainforest in parts, especially the swampy regions

@adamjedgar , do you get a chance to see some beautiful Australian nature sights? No pressure…we knew quite a few missionaries from both Australia and New Zealand.

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Found a mushroom I’ve been looking for years now. This is the first time I’ve seen one in person. It has heavily reticulated veining along the stalk. It’s the Frost’s Bolete and has a shaggy stalk.




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Flower spider (Misumena vatia)

Dutch: gewone kameleonspin (= common chameleon spider)

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If that’s what it looks like – Japanese knotweed – that’s in the top two worst invasive species in my region, destroying river and estuary ecologies worse than total devastation by fire: after a fire, native species return, but once knotweed gets established it chokes out all other plant life and thus all animal life.

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I saw a spider very similar to that ‘walking’ on the water at a swimming hole where I was drifting on an inner tube. It kept going till it encountered a floating leaf, then climbed on. I guessed it was resting, so I gently pushed the leaf to shore.

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Sorry, I didn’t get a good enough photo! it’s actually aspen/poplar shoots at the edge of the woods. I can see the similarity, though–on looking it up. I don’t think we have much Japanese knotweed here, yet. Up closer, the leaves are thicker and waxier, and the stems straighter and woodier.
We do have Russian olive, which is taking over a lot.

Thanks.

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The only aspen or poplar I’ve seen were at least 10m tall.

Or in firewood-sized chunks – there was a set of aspen trees at the Roman Catholic campus center that the city had told them that the trees had to come down, and the staff couldn’t figure out how to drop them given the location; I talked with one of the trustees and got him to be my ground crew boss – I went up the biggest trunk until it was about as high as I could go without my weight breaking it, hauled up my chainsaw with a rope, attached another rope to the top eight feet then cut beneath the rope so I could lower the top down, after which I worked my way back down cutting off firewood-sized chunks as I went (this was after a tree-removal specialist gave an estimate in high four figures – I took my pay in firewood).

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That is one beautiful, strange shroom!

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Marpissa muscosa

Dutch: schorsmarpissa (= bark marpissa), marpissa is a genus of jumping spiders (Salticidae)

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Jumping spiders are cool.

I encountered an interesting one recently; it had a web like a tunnel, and it lurked off to the side. I presume it pounces on prey and drags it into the tunnel?

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White ermine (Spilosoma lubricipeda)

Dutch: witte tijger (= white tiger)

I found out that in Dutch the term “vlinder” (butterfly) can be used for all species of the Lepidoptera order. But in English only the species of the suborder Rhopalocera are called butterflies. Other species are moths.

In Dutch we differentiate between “dagvlinders” (day[time] butterflies, although most people just call them “vlinders”), and “nachtvlinders” (night[time] butterflies). A synonym for nachtvlinder is “mot” (moth).

So in the end it seems that in both languages there is a difference between butterfly and moth. With the difference being that in Dutch moths can also be called butterflies.

I read this on Wikipedia:

Although the rules for distinguishing moths from butterflies are not well established, one very good guiding principle is that butterflies have thin antennae and (with the exception of the family Hedylidae) have small balls or clubs at the end of their antennae. Moth antennae are usually feathery with no ball on the end. The divisions are named by this principle: “club-antennae” (Rhopalocera) or “varied-antennae” (Heterocera).

Moth - Wikipedia

How reliable is this?


If my memory of a documentary I once watched is correct, that is indeed the case!

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What a beautiful creature!

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Cute young armadillo in our daughter’s yard.
IMG_5967

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Well, there’s something I’d never see in MY yard!

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