More Nonsense from Ken Ham

It’s not a big deal to Ken Ham. All those millions of dollars? He just sees them as thousands.

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Had to think a moment … but I see what you did with that! :smile:

I wonder who in that community was thinking that local drinking establishments could hope for some extra patronage? I can see it now … “Back to the bus, kids, but before we leave town we’re gonna stop by Bud’s Tap 'n Grill so we sponsors can knock back a few! The ride home will be so much more fun that way! Don’t worry – we’ll still have our designated driver.” (No need to mention this to your parents after we’re back … okay?)

Here’s another giant wooden boat being built in the Middle East (in Dubai) by traditional methods. But this boat is different. If all goes as planned, it’s going to float, and will be put to work carrying goods from the UAE to the East African coast.

Ken Ham doesn’t have this kind of faith in his ark.

I happened upon this golden oldie classic this morning and needed a place to share it. This “More Nonsense from Ken Ham” thread provided the perfect title.

What Did the Dinosaurs Eat?

“Dinosaurs could have eaten basically the same foods as the other animals. The large sauropods could have eaten compressed hay, other dried plant material, seeds and grains, and the like. Carnivorous dinosaurs—if any were meat-eaters before the Flood—could have eaten dried meat, reconstituted dried meat, or slaughtered animals. Giant tortoises would have been ideal to use as food in this regard. They were large and needed little food to be maintained themselves. There are also exotic sources of meat, such as fish that wrap themselves in dry cocoons.”

As always, I’d sure like to see the math. How many tortoises and self-wrapped fish cocoons were needed to sustain ark dinosaurs for the entire flood year?

Yes, so says AIG in this John Woodmoreappe classic. I defy a satirist to outdo what a YEC at AIG can parody on his own.

[Thanks to Professor Tertius’ newsletter for this blast from the past.]

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I gave it - satire - a shot recently. Your right, the AiG literature can’t be beat but its not hard to confuse other YECs into believing nonsense that sounds like their own work. There were people on FB arguing that what I said was a legit reading of Josephs famine. https://thenaturalhistorian.com/2017/02/09/answers-from-genesis-reclaiming-the-biblical-authority-of-josephs-global-famine/

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This made me laugh. As did the one linked in the comments over at GOE.

It’s like Genndy Tartakovsky’s Primal, but less thought out!

Remember that line in Cloverfield by a squaddie (GI)? ‘I dunno what it is, but it’s winning’. It’s anti-intellectuality.

PS The internet has facilitated it; the ultimate rumour machine. Whatever can be thought wrong, will be, on a mass scale. Rationality isn’t winning, it’s always been a minority pursuit and now its opposite is more powerful than ever. and cannot be opposed except by legislation, which, of course, is partisan to a terrifying degree in America as Texas shows.

I remember this old post. And I very much appreciated Socratic.Fanatic, one of our better participants.

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2 posts were split to a new topic: How do we define scientific reality, and does that differ from theologic reality?

I once had a Darwinist tell me this arose naturally. :joy:

Ken Ham is great and I would take my kids any day to see it. The ark isn’t just fiction but IS an historical reality as stated in the Bible.

For all your badmouthing YECs, you got one here!

The most surprising thing to me when I visited the Ark Encounter was the assortment of cages holding mock ups of dinosaurs.

It is truly surreal.

Why would the dinosaurs be problematic? It doesn’t align with common decent? Looking at it from a biblical perspective, how is it problematic? I would imagine that God brought juvenile dinosaurs on the ark. All the animals likely hibernated so there wasn’t need of a lot of food.

Cool video supporting global flood and young earth

Just a reminder that this is a nearly 5 year old post, and probably even the title would not be allowed today, I will separate out some of the current side issues into a new post or two, and if this one goes down the rabbit hole, will close it.

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Thomas, there are many reasons to recognize the flood story should bot be taken as a literal planet-wide flood.

Are you familiar with the NET Bible? It has excellent translators notes.

Consider:

  1. In Hebrew, the word translated world can also be translated land.
  2. In Hebrew, the word translated mountain can also be translated hill.
  3. In the Hebrew text, the ark landed on the hills (plural) of Ugarit. If it landed on multiple hills, they were not mountains.
    When you use hills instead of mountains and land instead of world, it is a local flood.

Did you ever notice the time between the waters receding and the bird returning with the olive branch is shorter than the gestation period of an olive seed?

I could go on with more examples.

Another important indication that we are not to take the early chapters of Genesis as literal history:
There are two creation stories with different orders and methods of creation, both cannot be literal history as they literal disagree as to how God created.

And you might look closely at Genesis 4. It is a wonderful story of the creation of society, including the development of farming and herding, metallurgy, music, civil law. These developments are typically attributed to a single person. The same man who developed bronze also developed iron!

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Thomas, dinosaurs living with man 5000 years ago is problematic because the evidence that God has given us in creation shows dinosaurs are much more ancient.

We have scriptures that have been preserved and we have other evidence that has been preserved. We need to look at all God has given us.

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I know that God is sovereign over the mutations in DNA. You don’t think so?

Listen to the video I link to and that responds to your post.

Cool video that supports the global flood and young earth

Friend,

It’s problematic because the dinosaurs lived and then died out millions of years ago, not because of common descent.

We can imagine and speculate much friend, but that doesn’t make it so. Let me ask you: what other extinct animals were on the ark? How do we know? And what, exactly, killed the dinosaurs?

All the animals hibernated? What about the animals that don’t or can’t?

-Joshua W.

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She doesn’t deal with the issues that I raised about what the Hebrew actually says.

And I will and another point:
She mentions the water rose 15 cubits above the highest mountains.

If you will look at the translator notes of the NET Bible, you will see the Hebrew text actually says the water rose 15 cubits and covered the high hills.

The text does not say the water rose 15 cubits above the hills. It says the water rose 15 cubits and covered the high hills.

In a few flat land like that found in large parts of the Middle East, a hill 15 cubits tall is very hill.

I will also add that “all” in the Bible does not mean 100% as it does in modern Western society. Consider these verses from Mark 1:
John the baptizer appeared in the wilderness, proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins.

5 And people from the whole Judean countryside and all the people of Jerusalem were going out to him, and were baptized by him in the river Jordan, confessing their sins.

Did “all the people” of Jerusalem go out to John and get baptized? Even the chief priests and Sanhedrin? No.

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“Let your conversation be always full of grace, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how to answer everyone.” -Colossians 4:6

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