Discovery Institute Exposed

WE are their livestock!
We ARE their livestock!
We are THEIR livestock!
We are their LIVESTOCK!

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Anybody remember To Serve Man?

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Picking one out of a few tens of thousands is a bit of a challenge, and what criterion should I use-weirdest to find? most visually interesting?


Tjaernoeia is definitely weird (especially the soft body)

And for visually striking, there are a number of candidates:






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And Soylent Green is people!

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Please don’t say such things - you’re frightening me.

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Yes, that’s right. It’s the law.

No need to - there are plenty of extant prokaryotes. Choose one and evolve a eukaryote from it.

What would be your first step? Got any idea?

In terms of evolutionary history, it’s a primative step.

Endosymbiosis is incredible stuff. Have you had a chance to read on some of it? Thanks

This is a very basic overview/summary, but there is a ton more research on it.

If you are asking how endosymbiosis starts, then there’s a lot out there, and I’d have to read up. It’s been just under 30 years since I did, but if you look at the genetic material of, say, mitochondria in people, it’s different from our nuclear material, which illustrates some of the evidence, too. Thanks.
5.7: Evolution of Eukaryotes - Biology LibreTexts

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Thanx, I check it out … looks interesting.

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As a matter of fact, mitochondrial DNA is actually closer to certain groups of bacteria than anything else (I think alpha-protobacteria, but would have to check).

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Isn’t that due to its probable origin, being incorporated by another organism in the distant past?

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Absolutely! I had a great teacher–that was an “aha” moment for me in cell and molecular biology

Yes, that seems likely.

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There is a need. If you want to repeat a historical evolutionary step then you need to be at the same starting point.

Give us a prokaryote with the same genome as those who evolved into eukaryotes and we will talk. Until then, your challenge makes no sense.

It’s a long process of many complex steps that took billions of years. Why in the world would you expect it to just happen in the lab in a few years?

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I don’t. The point is, no one can possibly produce a eukaryote from a prokaryote, therefore no one can possibly know how how to produce a eukaryote from a prokaryote, therefore no one can possibly claim to know how that evolution occurred.

Ditto for all the other macro-evolutions evident in the fossil record.

  • Why should you assume that original prokaryote had a differnt genome to an extant prokaryote?

  • Scientists claim that the same micro-evolutionary process that allowed a sheep dog (for example) to be produced from a wolf is the same process that allowed a macro-evolution such as a prokaryote producing a eukaryote. Dog-breeders didn’t need to know the genome of a wolf to produce a sheep dog, so why should you need to know the genome of a prokaryote to produce a eurkaryote?

  • Regardless, assuming you had the original prokaryote in question, how would you go about producing a eurkaryote from it? What would be your first step? Got any idea?

What motivates denial of reason? Fear of course. Nothing in reality, nature requires the unreal, the unnatural. But we’re all going to die. And that is fearful. That our little egos are meaningless yet can remain to the end by dementia is sadly amusing. Fear of oblivion unhinges really basic, inexorable reason. Makes us superstitious, clinging to grains of wheat randomly in the blizzard of chaff and saying ‘See! See!’. Nature abides.

We observe that all prokaryote genomes change over time. It isn’t an assumption. It’s an observation.

They started with the wolf genome. If you started with the whale genome, would you get a sheep dog?

In order to repeat the evolution of prokaryotes you need to start with the same genome. That genome no longer exists. Also, you would need 100’s of millions of years, just as it happened in history.

I have no idea since the evidence for the specific steps has been lost. I also can’t tell you which specific days in history that Napoleon clipped his fingernails. Does that mean the Battle at Waterloo never happened?

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Not at all necessarily – it will be sweet to fall asleep in Jesus as my parents did, but the process leading to it may be distinctly uncomfortable.

Translation: “I have no idea how eurkaryotes evolved from prokaryotes.”

Neither do you have any idea how amphibians evolved from fish, how reptiles evolved from amphibians, or how birds evolved from reptiles … etc, etc.

In other words, you can’t claim to know how evolution works.

But if it makes you feel any better, neither does anyone else… and no one ever will.

I’m not disputing whether evolution happened or not. I’m disputing the claim that science knows how it happened.

“Let your conversation be always full of grace, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how to answer everyone.” -Colossians 4:6

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