Anyone else new to EC and wish they could "undo" years of teaching their kids?


(Randy) #21

My kids go to Christian school and our church SS and get YEC direct discussions. My oldest son, Seth (10 years old) is really struggling with this. I’m EC, and at this point I just tell him that I think God could have done it by EC. I supplied a Biologos page about thermodynamics in response to his SS teacher’s class that it was not possible to have evolution and thermodynamics. He told me initially that he agreed with me, but then that it was impossible for EC to happen. I think it’s more of a battle of influence. I agree with you–it helped me a lot to know that someone else (in my case, VanTill, Young and Menninga from Calvin in “Science Held Hostage”) had a valid view. When Seth goes to HS or college, he may encounter more in depth arguments from evolution’s side, and early exposure will help. “Science Geek Sam” is a book I lent to my brother in law, who teaches and is YEC, and will give to Seth in a year or 2, too.


(Christy Hemphill) #22

I think it’s important we let our kids know they have freedom to think through things for themselves and that their parents are still thinking things through too. YEC ideas are only permanently damaging when they are wrapped up in lots of spiritual pressure and guilt trips and false choices.


(Randy) #23

That is so true! Humility sounds like a great key. I’ve been reminded more than once of the infighting among YEC, OE, ID, and EC (and other divisions) as a church split. I’ve heard that in church splits, the children become confused and frequently just stop attending (not sure of the stats there). However, it seems that humility is the best way to counter that and show love to cross those divides. A picture of Jesus comes better with love than with attention to minutiae. Thanks.


#24

That’s so true. I think many parents were and are under a lot of pressure to “have it all together” spiritually, especially in the homeschool world of the 80s and 90s. I’m sure it’s also possible to become too vulnerable, but we don’t have to have 100% rock-solid answers for every single minor aspect of faith.