Is H20 90-95% of global greenhouse effect?


(RiderOnTheClouds) #1

How accurate is this tweet? (by a climate skeptic)


(Stephen Matheson) #2

https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/monitoring-references/faq/greenhouse-gases.php?section=watervapor


#3

The way you came up with that reference is like there was a huge database that let you search for specific topics found on the internet. Is that utility available to the general public?


(Stephen Matheson) #4

Now, come on, not everyone knows about AltaVista. I think Netscape Navigator has it built in, but lots of Windows95 users are too hooked on Internet Explorer.


(Mervin Bitikofer) #5

Windows 95 is out now? Should I be upgrading from 3.2? This whole “click-and-drag” concept is growing on me. Gotta sign off for now, to play some pong.


#6

It is, but the amount of H2O is, in turn, partially regulated by the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere.


#7

I’d head “Yahoo” mentioned but I thought it was a chocolate drink.


(Mervin Bitikofer) #8

So - in summary … would it be fair to say that yes, water is the most abundant green house gas, but is far from being the most potent one. And in fact, it is itself part of the feedback loop for the whole situation, and one which we have little control over, in any case, because unlike choosing to use less fossil fuel (i.e. leaving more of it in the ground), we cannot choose to remove water from our environment. So it would be a pointless exercise to note any culpability of water. Other mechanisms, however, still exercise their more potent [per molecule] effects which remain culpable [as variables of significance] even though less abundant than water.

Is that a good summary?


(Matthew Pevarnik) #9

This reminds me of this well done and sourced Youtube video about this exact topic:


(system) closed #10

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